A career in construction can take you all the way to CEO.

Construction careers offer high pay, career advancement and cutting-edge technology. Wherever you are in your education, there’s a way for you to start training and earning the right credentials now. Click on the button below to begin exploring your career options within this interactive career path.

Start Your Career Path

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Middle School – CAREER AWARENESS

At this age, you should be exploring your career options in the construction industry. Here are ways you can get ahead of the game:

  • Learn the various industry sectors: residential, commercial and industrial construction.
  • Find out what career and technical education (CTE) classes are offered at your high school.
  • Attend a construction career day.

High School

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High School-Technical Centers

To set off on your construction career journey you can:

  • Take career and technical education (CTE) classes at your high school or a technical center.
  • Earn credentials in your high school classes if they are taught by NCCER-certified craft instructors.
  • Earn college credit with the earned credentials from some colleges.
  • Use your industry-recognized credentials to get a job with a company that will potentially assist with your education and training after high school.

Industry Apprentice

Community College

University Degree

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University Degree

If college is a part of your career path, you will:

  • Enroll in a four- or five-year program with no previous construction experience needed.
  • Study degrees such as design, project management, estimating, human resources, architecture, engineering and safety.
  • Gain knowledge through various technical, managerial and business courses.

Assistant Project Manager

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Assistant Project Manager

After completing a construction management program, the next step is to gain experience. At this stage you will:

  • Become the assistant for various positions such as project manager, estimator, safety manager, scheduler, quality assurance manager or human resource manager.
  • Gain experience as an assistant in these positions to become a manager yourself.
  • Progress from managing one project at a time to being responsible for multiple projects.
  • Potentially travel for the job depending on the size of the firm.

Project Manager

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Project Manager

It’s time to let your managerial skills shine. As a project manager, you will:

  • Utilize your management experience from working as an assistant project manager or a site superintendent.
  • Oversee multiple projects.
  • Work with everyone from craft professionals to the CEO of the company.
  • Plan, budget and document all aspects of a project.
  • Potentially travel depending on the size of the company you work for.

Senior Management

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Community or Technical College

As a part of these flexible programs, you will be able to:

  • Earn college credit upon completing construction craft training courses.
  • Experience hands-on learning and master skills.
  • Find a job in the field you are studying while attending school.

University Degree

Entry Level

Industry Apprentice

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Entry Level

When you’re ready for a construction job, a great way to build your resume is to:

  • Enter the workforce as a craft laborer or apprentice.
  • Work with a craft professional to further your skills.
  • Acclimate to a high-pressure environment.
  • Gain experience and journey-level assessments needed to impress employers.

Craft Professional

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Industry Apprenticeship

Experience the best of both worlds — learning and earning — with an apprenticeship. Here you can:

  • Earn money while you learn as a craft helper or apprentice.
  • Learn and get trained through companies whose instructors hold classes.
  • Find a company that will pay for you to attend technical or community college in the evening while you earn money during the day.

Craft Professional

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Craft Professional

After completing a training or college program, your next step could be working. As a craft professional, you:

  • Make an average income of $29.25 per hour*.
  • May travel frequently depending on company size and needs.
  • Build on your success with leadership training to become a crew leader or foreman.
  • Continue to learn and enroll in college to earn a construction management degree or other bachelor’s degrees.

*Average base pay from 2018 NCCER Craft Salary Survey

Crew Leader / Foreman

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Crew Leader / Foreman

As a crew leader or foreman you now have the skill and leadership abilities to:

  • Use your effective communication, planning and scheduling skills learned in leadership training.
  • Supervise a crew of craft professionals.
  • Oversee the safety and productivity of those under you.
  • Take management or supervisory training to become a safety manager, project manager or superintendent.

Site Superintendent

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Site Superintendent

Your expertise will come in handy as a site superintendent when you need to:

  • Manage all subcontractors and crews on site.
  • Use your knowledge from completed supervisory training or project management degree.
  • Travel to different jobs in the United States and the world depending on your company.
  • Advance your career and move into senior management or become a project manager.

Project Manager

Senior Management

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Senior Management

At this point, you have managed crew, sites, projects and more. In a senior management position, you:

  • Utilize your managerial experience at the corporate level.
  • Run various divisions such as quality control, estimating, safety, human resources and overall management.
  • Advise important decisions made for the company.
  • Use your knowledge of the process and working parts of a successful project.

CEO / Officer

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CEO, Executive, Owner

No matter where you started or what path you’ve taken, you’ve made it. In addition to running your own construction company, you can:

  • Look back on your unique career path.
  • Become a success story and inspiration to others.
  • Determine your own level of success with the flexibility of the construction industry.